Suzzanne

5 to Try This Weekend in San Diego

1. TRASH, The New Children’s Museum: Features the work of 12 artists from around the globe focused on the kid-friendly and timely topic of trash. The exhibition encompasses each work of art, hands on art-making projects, school curricula, artist lectures, family workshops and special events. The exhibition opens with a free community block party on October 15 and 16.

2. US Grant Prohibition Party: San Diego’s original 1930’s heyday speakeasy will be holding an inaugural modern-day Prohibition party. Held in the space that connects an underground tunnel from the original speakeasy to the Port of San Diego where booze was once illegally smuggled. The event will take place during the hotel’s 101st birthday, October 16. The event is open to the public and will feature jazzy live music from the era with various food and crafty beverage stations.

3. Halloween Spooktacular at SeaWorld: Discover an ocean of Halloween fun at SeaWorld’s Halloween Spooktacular every weekend in October. Catch silly and spooky shows including the Pirates 4-D movie experience. Then join in The Search for Captain Lucky’s Treasure in a walk-through adventure. Enjoy photo ops with your favorite friends from Sesame Street and trick-or-treat alongside huggable SeaWorld characters.

photo by Mike Rollerson

4. Haunted Trail of Balboa Park: The Haunted Trail is a stroll through the park you will never forget. Enter the mile long Trail through the twisted grove of pines and gnarled oaks. Visitors watch your back, you’ll never know which way the terror will hit you. True to form, the Trail is not for children under 10 or the faint of heart. Experience an outdoor terror that is simply too big to house indoors. Runs through October 31 (except Mondays and Tuesdays.)

5. Spooky Science at the Reuben H. Fleet Science Center: Fall into Spooky Science at the Fleet! Learn about all things scary from glow in the dark Flubber to spider webs and shocking activities. Special activities are only $2 with admission. Creep into the Discovery Lab if you dare; available Saturdays in October only.

Alison

Shhhhh…Gaslamp Has a Secret Speakeasy

Law Office of Eddie O'Hare or is it?

A girlfriend and I were recently on Fifth Avenue in the heart of Gaslamp Quarter looking for a bar. Actually, we were surrounded by bars – throbbing music, dancing disco lights and crowds of pretty party people.

But we were looking for a secret place, a prohibition-style underground speakeasy. We had an address. Finally, we found it above a nondescript door that read “Law Office – Eddie O‘Hare Esq.” We rang the buzzer.

A beefy dark-haired guy in a black jacket opened the door a crack. “Can I help you?” he asked.

My friend flashed the personalized e-tickets we’d printed out earlier in the day. “We’re on the guest list,” she added. Beefy nodded, opened the door a few inches wider and motioned us inside.

Feeling bootlegger cool, we headed down red carpeted stairs, banked by red walls, to the basement-level Prohibition lounge. Red lighting infused the scene with an edgy risqué feel. Steamboat Willie and other late ’20s era cartoon characters silently cavorted on flatscreen TVs. A slick jazz trio performed prohibition era tunes on a small stage; nobody danced. Music was loud enough to evoke vibe, but not so loud it competed with conversation.

There were maybe 40 people inside – in a wide range of ages. No scruffy t-shirts or running shoes – but few designer labels, either. Men behaved, per house rules that prohibit “unsolicited advances on female patrons.” The setting was comfortable, conducive to easy mingling.

Prohibition is about rediscovering (and reinventing) premium hand-made cocktails. Patrons crowded around the bar for a ringside show. Mixologist Levi Walker had the finesse of a 5-star chef as he constructed my pisco sour. There’s not a blender in sight here. When Walker finished hand shaking my cocktail, he added a dash of Amargo Chuncho to the foamy top. “Real Peruvian bitters,” he explained. “It’s made from barks, roots and flowers that grow in the Amazon. You can’t make a real pisco sour without it.”

Next, Walker dropped a straw into the concoction, keeping a finger over the sipping end to withdraw a taste of the drink. He took the taste, nodded approval, then served me his masterpiece. Exquisite. The straw-tasting was a routine repeated after each cocktail he mixed.

OK, so service may be a little slower here than in most Gaslamp bars – but fine art takes time. Most cocktails run around $12.

Prohibition is open from 7:00 pm  until 2:00 am Thursdays through Saturdays. Find it at 548 Fifth Ave. Before you can get in, you’ll have to get on the speakeasy’s guest list. To do that, go to the bar’s Website: www.ProhibitionSD.com. Click on “Guest List” and register. Occupancy is limited, so it’s wise to reserve in advance. Admission is free.

 

Stairwell to the 1920s

Real Drinks Take Time

Music